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Little Scientists at home

Stuck at home? We are working hard behind the scenes at Little Scientists to bring some fun little explorations to you! Feel free to share with your teacher, educator and crisis-schooling friends! And let us know if you have a particular exploration you want us to film!

Soil testing

Posted on June 9th, 2020 in the category(s) Little Scientists at home

Soil tipping from trowel

I remember picking my son up from school one day and a parent next to me saying ’Oh no, your child has had a terrible accident!’. To be honest, I could not see anything wrong! He was just covered in mud. The reason? he had been lying in the soft mulch making dirt angels. Dirt is fascinating. Why not look at the different soils you can find on a walk or in the garden? Describe them with your senses.

Sparkling water

Posted on June 1st, 2020 in the category(s) Little Scientists at home

Carbonated water being poured into glass

At Little Scientists, we are all about spotting STEM opportunities in the everyday. Exploring with sparkling water, or to children more commonly known as fizzy water, might not be an everyday occurrence but is a fascinating way to introduce gases (in this case carbon dioxide) and if you have access to a soda stream, it could be even more fun!

Sinking or floating: Fruit

Posted on May 27th, 2020 in the category(s) Little Scientists at home

sliced fruit on a wooden board

One of our wonderful Local Network Partners up in North Queensland, Jim Callan, contacted me the other day to
talk about a new STEM exploration called floating oranges. He told me that oranges with peel on float and if you
take the peel o, they sink. He challenged me to nd out whether it worked for other fruit.

Sinking or floating: liquids

Posted on May 27th, 2020 in the category(s) Little Scientists at home

oil floating in water

How can we explain an oil spill disaster to children and what is the science behind it? Examine the density of liquids using common household ingredients.

Cabbage chemistry – Chemical reactions

Posted on May 19th, 2020 in the category(s) Little Scientists at home

Purple liquids in chemistry flasks

It is not necessary for you to have any understanding of chemical reactions for this activity. The beauty of this activity is that you can discover what substances are acidic or alkali within your house alongside the children. The colour changes, reactions and fizzes are a very exciting part of this exploration.

We’re going on a bear hunt

Posted on May 4th, 2020 in the category(s) Little Scientists at home

Teddy bears in window

At Little Scientists we take STEM in the everyday very seriously. Seriously fun. These activities are straight from our Professional development workshops Mathematics: shape and space. Which is all about spotting the Mathematics in everyday life. This is a wonderful activity for both very young and older preschoolers. It is designed to add everyday mathematical language into playtime.

Potions and lotions

Posted on April 29th, 2020 in the category(s) Little Scientists at home

Sugar and herbs mixed in a metal bowl

A chance to experiment with smells, textures and, although not in this activity unless heavily supervised, tastes is part of our experiences of the world. Using our senses is important to developing our sense of the world.  This activity is a wonderful way to use STEM to develop observational skills.

Making chalk paint

Posted on April 29th, 2020 in the category(s) Little Scientists at home

Boy painting large rainbow on path

Make your own rainbow chalk using household ingredients and in the process help children learn about measurement, viscosity, fluids and colour mixing. Do you know what a non-newtonian fluid is? You will after this Little Scientists at Home activity.

Build a marble run

Posted on April 28th, 2020 in the category(s) Little Scientists at home

3 marbles on bench

A marble run is a great activity for children to hone in on their engineering skills whilst having a lot of fun!
Although not essential, a large cork board can be helpful to begin the project and attach the track to. You could
also begin with a large box or you could attach the run directly to a wall using blue tack. A glass door or mirror
door is a good option also as you can use tape without damage.

Tin foil boats

Posted on April 28th, 2020 in the category(s) Little Scientists at home

Coloured tinfoil shaped into boats floating on pond

We, at Little Scientists, had quite a bit of coloured tinfoil left over from the Easter eggs. And lots of very pretty boats started appearing. The designs varied, some of them floated whilst others didn’t. So we designed a challenge – build a boat from a piece of 30 cm by 30 cm tinfoil that can carry as many marbles as possible.

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